3. Helping Your Student Become a Good Reader

In the next few sections we will discuss the steps you will take to help your student become a good reader, starting with some exercises that will help you understand why your student can graduate from high school without being able to read. In this section, we will discuss the following topics:


  • Understanding your student's reading difficulties
  • Activating your student's prior knowledge
  • Understanding the characteristics of poor readers and good readers
  • Using effective reading instruction with adults


  • 17 comments:

    lillian said...

    many do not comprehend

    Pat said...

    it takes time to understand

    Jenny said...

    Activating prior knowledge can be very powerful. Learners are much more able to retain information that is built on their own knowledge and experiences.

    Ms. Ovette said...

    This next section ought to be interesting. I wonder how easy or difficult it is for someone who's been away from school for many years to access that "prior" knowledge. Does the skills that they did learn go away if they haven't been used?

    sandy said...

    I agree with Jenny's comments. An adult learner will learn and remember to a greater degree if it is related to something that is already part of their experience.

    Marian said...

    Lot's to learn.

    Marian said...

    Lot's to learn.

    Lynn said...

    Looking forward to this part!

    neg said...

    Too much information to aborb all at once, I think this is something I must go back to many times.

    SNelson said...

    Using tools the student has knowledge of is going to be the driving force in comprehension.

    Megan N said...

    I can't imagine how difficult high school must have been for them.

    Kenneth Zen Bodhi said...

    Good section, good information.

    Regina Cook said...

    "All I have learned, I learned from books." ~Abraham Lincoln.

    MSTATEN said...

    Great! I never understood how students just got by. This should be interetsting

    Penny Speidel said...

    Great example!

    Carol R said...

    I totally know this one. As one who couldn't read until my late teens /early 20's, I totally know how I graduated. Good at math and science, reading symbol sentences was a breeze. Thankfully Classic Comic books were around in those days, truly. After years of frustration, I finally bit the bullet , took a speed reading class in my younger years, and at 50 put myself into a PhD program in humanities...to learn how to write!

    Sherry Unruh said...

    We must find out why the student had problems while going through school. This will help in finding the right plan of action to learning.