6. Understanding the Characteristics of Good Readers and Poor Readers



      23 comments:

      Queen Of My Castle said...

      I agree with this section completely! I wish more focus was put on the poor readers in the school system instead of the good readers.

      tutorgirl said...

      This reminds me of riding a bike. Seems so easy once you know, but hard when you are learning to break down the pieces and then put them all together!

      Biltz said...

      You could make analogies with lots of routine activities that are really quite complex-driving, golfing, etc.

      lillian said...

      Things are not always as easy as they seem.

      Pat said...

      This takes commitment and work

      jack said...

      To have a purpose and reasoning of the subject matter makes sense.

      Ms. Ovette said...

      Reading difficult material out loud can be helpful.

      Marian said...

      Leaving these comments illustrates the good reader's ability to summarize what she has read.

      Lynn said...

      I had no idea we were doing all this.

      neg said...

      I agree..I had no idea we were doing all this.

      SNelson said...

      I consider myself a good reader, yet had no idea of the sequence of my thinking while reading.

      Martha said...

      I found the video: "Steps to Creating a Language Experience Story" very helpful. It provided a step by step demonstration on how to utilize a student's knowledge a topic, what more they would like to know about that topic, and what they learned about the topic in the process. They then convert their personal experience into a story that they learn to read themselves.

      Megan N said...

      Makes sense! The titles of a passage really matter!

      Kenneth Zen Bodhi said...

      This was perfect information and one that really demonstrates the point.

      lizbeth rakaczky said...

      I take these techniques for granted without realizing that I use them.

      Regina Cook said...

      These two charts, poor readers v. good readers, illustrates the expansive gap in an individual's abilities. The attributes listed for good readers lend to the readiness for higher order thinking.

      MSTATEN said...

      Good to know

      Mme Brown said...

      Makes sense.

      Penny Speidel said...

      When good readers lose their concentration, they stop and make adjustments. Poor readers don't know what they don't know!

      james powers said...

      Seems like poor readers should be working on short passages that stretch their abilities a little at a time so that they can develop overall retention and comprehension.

      Sherry Unruh said...

      Understanding the reason why some people seem to do better than others will help in teaching on a one on one bases.

      Ro said...

      The chart is a helpful reminder on what a good reader does and how to articulate it to a learning reader.

      WAYNE CHARLOTTE said...


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      1. Vocabulary Development and Instruction: A Prerequisite for School Learning
      Andrew Biemiller, University of Toronto

      2. Early reading acquisition and its relation to reading experience and ability 10 years later.
      Cunningham AE, Stanovich KE.

      3. Double Jeopardy How Third-Grade Reading Skills and Poverty Influence High School Graduation
      Donald J. Hernandez, Hunter College and the Graduate Center,